It's impossible to keep away from chocolate this Easter. We're just into 2013 and already Easter eggs are lining the supermarket shelves. So as a parent, what do you do when your child is desperately tugging on your hand at the checkout in a plea to buy them chocolate?

The truth is, chocolate is okay in moderation. However, during Easter people tend to consume an overload of chocolate and lollies. So why not promote the idea to your family and friends that sugary sweets are alright in small portions, as long as you follow a great dental routine.

Let's take a look at a few tactics that can help minimise tooth decay this Easter:

Presents

Easter is a time when chocolate eggs are given as gifts. Why not give people a chocolate egg, along with some toothpaste and a toothbrush with a note outlining to brush after consumption? This little reminder can highlight how important it is to look after their teeth.

Additionally, you can refrain from giving chocolate presents altogether. Build an Easter basket yourself and fill it with clever alternatives like beach toys, stuffed animals, seeds for planting, or even a new electric toothbrush!

Create restrictions

Encourage others to either cut down their chocolate intake or set limitations - this can be done by only allowing your children to enjoy eating sweet treats at mealtimes rather than between meals.

Post-care

Every time you eat an Easter egg or lollies, drink a glass of tap water to wash away leftover sugars; it can turn into acid and cause tooth decay. Also, the fluoride found in tap water is known to protect your teeth enamel.

Don't forget to brush and floss your teeth daily. If you're concerned about the implications chocolate can have on your teeth, try brushing and flossing straight after you eat an Easter egg or sweets. At the end of the day, view Easter eggs as a treat and it will give you the will power to avoid overindulging in them.

Our Address

150 Canterbury Road, Blackburn South, VIC 3130

Find us on

Any surgical or invasive procedure carries risks. Before proceeding, you should seek a second opinion from an appropriately qualified health practitioner.

Part of
  • Bupa Members First Dentist
  • Dental Care Network Australia
Affiliations & Memberships
  • Sound Sleeper
  • International Congress of Oral Implantologists (ICOI)
  • Dental Practices Accredited by QIP
  • SmileChoice - Bite Sized Payments
  • Digital Smile Design Member
Leave a message
Australia